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migration agents Melbourne

NEW AGED CARE LABOUR AGREEMENT FOR MIGRANT COMMUNITIES

NEW AGED CARE LABOUR AGREEMENT FOR MIGRANT COMMUNITIES

In March this year the Minister for Immigration, Citizenship and Multicultural Affairs, Mr David Coleman, announced special visa arrangements which will enable aged care facilities to access a personalised visa arrangement to hire employees with the skills necessary to cater for the needs of their elderly residents.

The announcement is in response to recognition of the fact that many aged care providers have a need for bilingual carers. It is a significant initiative, as the occupation is not currently on the list of Eligible Skilled Occupations.

"Elderly people or those with dementia may revert to their native language or lose the ability to speak a second language," the Minister said, explaining part of the rationale underlying the decision.

The labour agreements will make it easier for aged care providers to deliver specialised services that better understand a residents' cultural needs, however it has been emphasised that such arrangements will only be considered where it is demonstrated that Australians cannot fill skill shortages and standard work visa programs cannot be utilised.

Aged care providers wishing to take advantage of this program will need to request a company-specific labour agreement to sponsor skilled overseas workers for a Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) visa, or an Employer Nomination Scheme (ENS) visa. As part of the process it will be necessary to demonstrate what efforts have been made to fill the position from the local labour market. Hopeful visa applicants will need to demonstrate English language ability equivalent to International English Language Testing System (IELTS) component scores of at least 4.5, and an overall IELTS score of at least 5.0.

Nevett Ford Lawyers has experience in applying for labour agreements, and can assist aged care providers who might be interested in accessing overseas workers in situations where they have been unable to fulfil their labour needs.

Please contact Nevett Ford Lawyers Melbourne for further information and advice.

Telephone: +61 3 9614 7111

Email: melbourne@nevettford.com.au

Nevett Ford Immigration Lawyers & Registered Migration Agents

Our experience in assessing individual circumstances ensures that you will be provided the best visa options for you and your family, and your business.  We can also represent you in relation to visa refusals and appeals to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal, Federal Court and Ministerial Intervention cases.

We will provide a complete and personalised service starting from the initial consultation, establishment of the direction of your case, and provide advice on the best visa and/or appeal options in the circumstances.

Nevett Ford Immigration Lawyers and Registered Migration Agents provide the following:-

 
  • Initial discussion to establish the direction of your case and the visa options available in accordance with the Migration Regulations, including the associated costs and benefits of all options.
  • Supply document checklists and forms required from visa applicant and/or sponsor.
  • Assistance to accurately prepare supporting evidence and complete applications.
  • Preparation of all necessary submissions to the Department of Home Affairs (DHA) in Australia or to Australian Visa Office overseas.
  • Ongoing liaison with the DHA and other government authorities as required
  • Representing you in relation to complex appeals matters at the Administrative Appeals Tribunal (AAT), Federal Court and Ministerial Intervention cases.
  • Advice and assistance to arrange the requisite medical and police checks as required.
  • Advice and assistance to respond to ‘Requests for further Information’ from DHA.
  • Communicating with third parties (doctors, psychologists, employers etc) to obtain supporting documentation in support of your application.
  • Ongoing progress reporting on your matter throughout the process.

For advice and assistance please contact us today on:

Telephone: +61 3 9614 7111
Email: melbourne@nevettford.com.au

NEW Skilling Australians FUND (SAF)

The Skilling Australians Fund legislation has just been passed in the Senate.

The Australian Government has stated that the purpose of the Skilling Australians Fund (the Fund) is for it to provide ongoing funding for vocational education and training (VET).  The Fund is supposed to support 300,000 more apprenticeships, traineeships, pre-apprenticeships, pre‑traineeships, and higher apprenticeships all across Australia.

The revenue for the Fund will be financed by the Government’s skilled migration reforms that require employers who sponsor a foreign worker to pay a Nomination Training Contribution Charge (known as a levy) under the following visa types, including:

 
  • Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) visa
  • Employer Nomination Scheme (ENS) (subclass 186) visa
  • Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (RSMS) (subclass 187) visa

The levy has replaced the previous training benchmarks for employers who sponsor foreign workers on the above mentioned visas.

The new levy is payable by companies sponsoring overseas candidates for subclass 482/TSS visas and subclass 186 visas. The new system is a simpler one and for many employers it will be easier to meet and to administer. The training levy will be payable per application and at the nomination stage of the visa process. For each person an employer sponsors they will pay a set amount per year. The other relevant fact is the size of the employer's business or more specifically the size of their sales turnover or revenue. There will be one levy for employers with a turnover of less than $10 million and a higher amount for employers with a turnover of $10 million and above.

The amounts for a TSS/ subclass 482 visa are:

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For permanent residence employer sponsored applications - visa subclass 186/187. The permanent application figure is a higher payment bit it is one off payment and paid not annually:

 
  • If turnover less than $10 million - $3000
  • If turnover $10 million or higher - $5000

Some good news is that the levy will be tax deductible and if a nomination is refused or where an incorrect application is lodged and withdrawn, the levy will be refunded. However the cost of Skilling Training Fund levy cannot be passed on to the visa applicant.

If you need more information on SAF, call one of our Lawyers and Agents for a consultation.

Australian Taxation Office (ATO) and Immigration

The Government is implementing measure in attempt to clamp down on fraud, tax avoidance, superannuation requirements and working without proper permission.  This may impact you directly if you are a visa holder.

The Australian Tax Office (ATO) has announced that around 20 million visa holders are to be scrutinised under a data matching scheme with the aim of catching those who are avoiding tax, falling foul of superannuation compliance and working illegally.

What it means

Under the data matching scheme, the ATO will become privy to your tax, bank, social security and wages and will be able to share this information with the Department of Home Affairs (DHA) (Immigration).

This means it will be easier for officials to detect anyone who is flouting their obligations be that a visa holder or an employer.

The Federal Government will look at records and review information on not just sponsors and visa holders but also migration agents and education providers.  Officials will be able to find out where visa holders have travelled, where they have worked or studied and the payments they have received.

It could also mean that those who left Australia may be entitled to superannuation which they didn’t know about.

How will it affect employers and visa holders?

If you claimed that you undertook some regional work as part of your Working Holiday Visa but didn’t actually carry it out, if that information comes to light, it could prevent you from extending your visa.

If you're employer and an approved sponsor, then you have a duty to keep records of wages and produce pay slips. Even if you pay cash, this needs to be documented.

Subclass 457 and 482 visa holder employees who do not declare their wages to the ATO will be found to be in breach of their visa conditions and this may lead to visa cancellation.

Data matching will pick up any discrepancies between Business Activity Statements (BAS), tax assessments, bank records between employers and employees.  

If evidence emerges that you’re an employer who offers sponsorship and are paying visa holders below average wages, then it could result in your sponsorship approval being cancelled.

When will the audit take place?

This audit will take place over the next three years and is part of a recent Australian Government drive to pay closer attention to the information it holds and be able to share records to investigate fraud and non-compliance.

Should you have any questions about the above information or if you want to discuss your particular circumstances in more detail please do not hesitate to contact us for a confidential discussion on (03) 9614 7111.

 

Global Talent Visa

On Sunday 18th March 2018 the subclass 457 visa was abolished and immediately replaced with the Temporary Skilled Shortage Visa (TSS visa).  Against the backdrop of this well publicised reform, The Minister for Citizenship and Multicultural Affairs, The Hon Alan Tudge MP announced a further expansion of this program, unveiled as the Global Talent Visa.  The Global Talent Visa will in effect be a new stream of the TSS program that will apply in two different scenarios:

1.       Established business wanting to employ high income earners from abroad with salaries of AUD$180,000 and above; or

2.       For proposed employees of “approved” start-up entities which operates within STEM fields. 

Prior to its abolition, there was widespread criticism that the 457 visa program was no longer fit for purpose and this served as a significant driver for its reform and ultimate replacement with the TSS visa.  So far a lot of focus of the TSS visa has been on the occupation lists and the restrictions in this area however, the mechanics of the TSS visa limit not just the types of roles which are permitted to be filled by overseas nationals, but also to limit the types of businesses that are permitted to use this program.  For many occupations, minimum turnover and minimum existing employee head counts are required before the business can access the TSS program.

These additional limitations can dramatically reduce the options available for start-ups.  Under the Global Talent Visa pathway, there will be no specific occupation limitations however, under both streams, the business will be required to demonstrate that the appointment will have the capacity to pass on skills or to develop other Australian employees.  

The 12-month trial, if successful will allow the visa holders to access Permanent residency in ways that mirror the existing Permanent Residency pathways for TSS visa holders with occupations on the Medium to Long Term visa.  Like all TSS visas, the applicants will be required to meet health and character and have the skills and experience necessary to perform the role. 

Should you have any questions about the above information or if you want to discuss how your business can access these arrangements in more detail please do not hesitate to contact us for a confidential discussion on (03) 9614 7111 on send us an on-line enquiry.

Skilling Australians Fund

There have been significant legislative changes affecting visa holders and applicants of both the permanent Skilled Migration Program and the Temporary Skilled Migration Program (often known as the 457 visa program) and these continue throughout 2018.  However there are also changes forecasted for employers who participate in these programs, specifically in terms of an increased economic contribution into a newly formed fund designed to increase the skills, training and vocational education of Australians.

A Commitment to Training – The Existing Requirements

At present, in order to be an approved sponsor for the purposes of the 457 visa program (or support an application for permanent residency through the employer sponsored program), an organisation has two ways in which they can demonstrate their commitment to training. 

The first option is to demonstrate that they are spending at least 1% of their annual payroll on activities for the benefit of their employees that can be appropriately characterised as having a learning outcome.  These requirements come with a few caveats including:

  • The training outcomes must fit the size, scope and nature of the business;
  • The training must be for the benefit of Australian employees; and
  • The expenditure must not be for family members of the principals of the business. 

This leaves some discretion in the hands of employers as to how they want to engage and develop the skills of their existing employees.  For example, one of the most direct and obvious ways in which it is possible to meet the training obligations is for an employer to take on an apprentice or trainee.  The wages paged to that individual are then directly attributable to the employer’s commitment to training.

In the event a particular employer cannot meet this requirement there is an alternative option whereby a contribution to the value of 2% of the organisation’s annual payroll can be made into an Industry Training Fund (such as TAFE organisations). 

Skilling Australians Fund – The New Requirements

Commencing in March 2018, a new fund will be set up to assist with vocational education and training for Australians – the Skilling Australians Fund.  While the details of the funding model are currently being finalised, it will in part be funded by organisations who are participating in the temporary and permanent employer sponsored programs.

Organisations who have a need to source labour from abroad will be categorised as either small or large organisations depending on whether their turnover is below or above $10 Million.  From there they will be required to pay a levy per applicant into the Skilling Australians Fund.  From the information that has been announced, the levy will be payable in full at the time of the nomination, that is before a decision has been made on the nomination or the visa applications. 

The details of the levy payable are as follows: 

Table One:  Overview of Skilling Australian Levy of Organisations participating in Economic Migration Programs

Migration Program     

Temporary (457 / TSS) Visa Program
- Small Organisation: $1,200 per year per visa applicant
- Large Organisation: $1,800 per year per visa applicant

Permanent Visa Program
- Small Organisation: $3,000 per year per visa applicant
- Large Organisation: $5,000 per year per visa applicant

Should you have any questions about the above information or if you want to discuss how your business can access these arrangements in more detail please do not hesitate to contact us for a confidential discussion on (03) 9614 7111 on send us an on-line enquiry.

 

The new Temporary Skills Shortage (TSS) Visa

The Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) visa will come into effect by March 2018.  It replaces the 457 visa and will be split into two groups Short-Term stream and Medium-Term stream. Here’s what you need to know:

What happens if I am on a 457 visa?

Those currently on a 457 visa will continue under the existing rules which apply to a 457.  The Department of Immigration and Border Protection is expected to announce what may happen to these 457 holders in the future.  It may be that an individual can transfer from a 457 to a TSS visa.

Short-Term TSS stream

The aim of the Short-Term TSS visa scheme is to allow businesses to fill posts with foreign workers on a temporary basis. They can only do this when they cannot find a suitably skilled Australian worker.

The positions eligible on the Short-Term TSS visa stream will be listed on the Short-Term Skilled Occupations List.  It’s a two-year visa with the possibility of one renewal so that’s a maximum of four years. It’s not clear at this stage whether they will be available to move onto permanent residency under the Employee Nominated Scheme (ENS) or Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (RSMS). All potential applicants will need to meet a certain standard of English and score 5 or above on an International English Testing System (IELTS). 

Medium-Term TSS stream

The aim of this scheme is to allow Australian businesses to fill posts with foreign workers where there is a severe shortage in highly skilled and in demand occupations.  These positions have been assessed as being of high value to the Australian economy.

The positions eligible on the Medium-Term TSS visa stream will be listed on the Medium and Long Term Skilled Occupations List.  This visa is available for 4 years and people can qualify for permanent residency after three years of employment with the same employer.

For further information, advice and assistance, please contact the experienced team of Immigration Lawyers and Registered Migration Agents at Nevett Ford Lawyers Melbourne:

Telephone: + 61 3 9614 7111

Emailmelbourne@nevettford.com.au

 

 

Visa Cancellation

The Full Federal Court of Australia has clarified the test of “risk” in cancellation decisions.

Justice Charlesworth in the case of Muggeridge v Minister for Immigration and Border Protection [2017] FCAFC 200 held at paragraph 46:
        ‘The fact of prior offending will, in most if not all cases, invite consideration of the question of whether the person in question in fact presents some risk to the Australian community and the starting point in that consideration will invariably be the fact of the prior offending. But that is all. The statute does not, of itself, supply an answer to the factual question of whether a particular visa holder has a propensity, however slight, to re-offend.’

This case will likely have a large impact on person’s whose visa was cancelled on the basis of historical offending.

If your visa has been cancelled or you have received a notice of intention to cancel, it is important to obtain proper legal advice.

For further information, advice and assistance, please contact the experienced team of Immigration Lawyers and Registered Migration Agents at Nevett Ford Lawyers Melbourne:

Telephone: + 61 3 9614 7111

Email: melbourne@nevettford.com.au

Changes for visa applicants in same-sex relationships

From 9 December 2017, you can apply for a visa as your partner’s ‘spouse’ if you are in a same-sex marriage following the legalisation of same-sex marriage in Australia.

Under the changes, if you are in a same-sex marriage you can apply for a visa as your partner’s ‘spouse’, rather than as their ‘de facto partner’.

The changes will apply to Partner visas (subclasses 100, 309, 801 and 820) and to all other visas where you can include your spouse in your application.

You can also apply for a Prospective Marriage visa (subclass 300) if you are in a same-sex relationship and genuinely intend to marry your prospective spouse in Australia.

For further information, advice and assistance, please contact the experienced team of Immigration Lawyers and Registered Migration Agents at Nevett Ford Lawyers Melbourne:

Telephone: + 61 3 9614 7111

Email: melbourne@nevettford.com.au