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ADOPTION VISA – Australia (Subclass 102 visa)

The Australian Adoption visa (subclass 102) lets a child come to Australia to live with their adoptive parent. The child can already be adopted or be in the process of being adopted. The adoptive parent sponsors the child for this visa and usually applies on their behalf.

This is a permanent residence visa. If the adoption is through a State or Territory adoption authority, you can lodge the application before the adoption is finalised.

To apply for the Adoption Visa (Permanent) (Subclass 102), the child must be:

  • outside Australia when applying for the visa
  • adopted:

- with the involvement of an Australian State or Territory adoption authority (either under the Hague Adoption Convention, a bilateral adoption with a competent authority of another country, or another adoption agreement)
- under the laws of a country other than Australia and their sponsor or their sponsor's partner has and been living outside Australia for the 12 months before the child applies for the visa

  • sponsored by their adoptive parent or their adoptive parent's partner
  • under 18 years of age when the application is lodged and when it is decided.

The child must also be sponsored by an adoptive parent who is:

  • an Australian citizen; or
  • the holder of an Australian permanent resident visa; or
  • an eligible New Zealand citizen.

What this visa lets the child do

It allows the child to:

  • travel to and stay in Australia indefinitely
  • work and study in Australia
  • enrol in Medicare, Australia’s scheme for health-related care and expenses
  • apply for Australian citizenship (if they are eligible)
  • sponsor eligible relatives for permanent residence
  • travel to and from Australia for five years from the date the visa is granted – after that time they will need another visa to enter Australia

Guardianship of children adopted from overseas

  •  If an adoption is not finalised or if it is not recognised by a state or territory adoption authority when the child enters Australia, the Minister for Immigration and Border Protection will be the guardian of the child. The guardianship powers are delegated to state and territory welfare authorities.
  • The minister stops being the guardian if any of the following occur:

- the child becomes an Australian citizen
- the child turns 18 years of age
- an Australian adoption order is made for the child

Adoptive parents living in Australia

Your relevant Australian State or Territory Central Adoption Authority (STCAA) must be involved in managing the adoption process with the country where the child is living.

If you are considering adopting a child from outside Australia, you should contact the central adoption authority in your State or Territory.

Privately arranged adoptions

Australian STCAAs do not generally support privately arranged adoptions either from in or outside Australia, including the adoption of children who are relatives. They are not able to help children or sponsors to meet the eligibility requirements for granting a visa to an adopted child.

Important: If you want to proceed with an adoption from outside Australia, which has not been arranged by your STCAA, it is strongly recommended you first seek legal advice both in Australia and in the country where the child lives.

Adoptive parents living outside Australia

Adoptions that are undertaken by Australian citizens, permanent residents or eligible New Zealand citizens who usually live in countries other than Australia, and that are arranged without the assistance of an Australian STCAA, are known as expatriate adoptions.

It is important to obtain appropriate advice before embarking on the adoption process.  Nevett Ford Lawyers has expertise in all aspects of the adoption visa process and can provide advice and assistance.

Please contact us today for further information:

Telephone: +61 3 9614 7111

Email: melbourne@nevettford.com.au

Global Talent Visa

On Sunday 18th March 2018 the subclass 457 visa was abolished and immediately replaced with the Temporary Skilled Shortage Visa (TSS visa).  Against the backdrop of this well publicised reform, The Minister for Citizenship and Multicultural Affairs, The Hon Alan Tudge MP announced a further expansion of this program, unveiled as the Global Talent Visa.  The Global Talent Visa will in effect be a new stream of the TSS program that will apply in two different scenarios:

1.       Established business wanting to employ high income earners from abroad with salaries of AUD$180,000 and above; or

2.       For proposed employees of “approved” start-up entities which operates within STEM fields. 

Prior to its abolition, there was widespread criticism that the 457 visa program was no longer fit for purpose and this served as a significant driver for its reform and ultimate replacement with the TSS visa.  So far a lot of focus of the TSS visa has been on the occupation lists and the restrictions in this area however, the mechanics of the TSS visa limit not just the types of roles which are permitted to be filled by overseas nationals, but also to limit the types of businesses that are permitted to use this program.  For many occupations, minimum turnover and minimum existing employee head counts are required before the business can access the TSS program.

These additional limitations can dramatically reduce the options available for start-ups.  Under the Global Talent Visa pathway, there will be no specific occupation limitations however, under both streams, the business will be required to demonstrate that the appointment will have the capacity to pass on skills or to develop other Australian employees.  

The 12-month trial, if successful will allow the visa holders to access Permanent residency in ways that mirror the existing Permanent Residency pathways for TSS visa holders with occupations on the Medium to Long Term visa.  Like all TSS visas, the applicants will be required to meet health and character and have the skills and experience necessary to perform the role. 

Should you have any questions about the above information or if you want to discuss how your business can access these arrangements in more detail please do not hesitate to contact us for a confidential discussion on (03) 9614 7111 on send us an on-line enquiry.

New Subclass 482 Temporary Skill Shortage Visa

As a result of a broad package of reforms relating to employer sponsored skilled visa programs, announced by the Government on 18 April 2017 the 457 visa will cease to exist on 18 March and will be replaced by the new Temporary Skill Shortage (Subclass 482) visa which enables employers to access a temporary skilled overseas worker if an appropriately skilled Australian worker is unavailable.

An overseas worker must be nominated by a sponsoring business and obtain a Subclass 482 visa before they can commence work in Australia. The Subclass 482 visa has three streams:

  • Short-term stream – allows employers to source skilled overseas workers in occupations on the Short-term Skilled Occupation List (STSOL) for a maximum of two years (or up to four years if the two year limitation would be inconsistent with an international trade obligation);
  • Medium-term stream – allows employers to source skilled overseas workers for occupations on the Medium and Long-term Strategic Skills List (MLTSSL) for up to four years; and
  • Labour Agreement stream – allows employers to source skilled overseas workers in accordance with a labour agreement with the Commonwealth, where there is a demonstrated need that cannot be met in the Australian labour market and standard visa programs are not available.

Changes to the Employer Nomination Scheme (Subclass 186) visa and the Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (Subclass 187) visa will be implemented to complement the introduction of the Subclass 482 visa. The main changes will result in a tightening of eligibility for these visas by reference to criteria dealing with age, employment history, salary, English language, and eligible occupations.

Changes to eligibility requirements for the Temporary Residence Transition stream in the Subclass 186 and Subclass 187 visas will not apply to persons who held or had applied for a Subclass 457 visa when the changes were announced by the Government on 18 April 2017.

If you require further information or advice please contact the experienced team at Nevett Ford Lawyers.

Temporary Skill Shortage visa (TSS Visa) and Skilled Occupation Lists (SOL)

The Skilled Occupation List (SOL) is a list of skilled occupations that are in demand.

Occupations on the SOL List are assessed on an ongoing basis with new roles being included and removed from time to time (Immigration has confirmed that the list will be revised every 6 months).

The new Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) visa (subclass 482) will come into effect in March and will replace the 457 program.

The TSS visa will still allow skilled workers to come to Australia to help fill a legitimate skills shortage. But this new type of visa will have fewer eligible skilled occupations than the 457 visa.

The Short-Term stream of the TSS visa will allowing an individual a stay of up to two years, and a Medium-Term stream will allow a stay of up to four years. The occupations will now be divided into the Short Term Skilled Occupations List (STSOL) for those applying under the Short-Term stream and the Medium and Long-term Strategic Skills Occupation List (MTSOL) for those applying under the Medium-Term Stream.

These new occupation lists for the new Temporary Skills Shortage (TSS) visa, along with the Employer Nomination Scheme (ENS) 186 visa and Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (RSMS) 187 visa will be published in March 2018.

The Short-Term stream visa is renewable only once in Australia. 

The Medium-Stream visa holders may renew their visas onshore and may apply for permanent residence pathway after working for three years in Australia.

Tighter regulations

These new visa streams will have stricter requirements attached to them, and this includes higher English language capability, work experience requirements, additional character, anti-discrimination and training requirements and salary rates in line with current Australian market rate salaries. There will also be strict Labour Market Testing (LMT) requirements which means business sponsors will have to test the local labour market before taking someone from overseas.

If you require further information or advice please contact the experienced team at Nevett Ford Lawyers.

Subclass 187 RSMS is an alternative solution to Permeant Residence

The RSMS (Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme) has significant benefits as compared to other skilled migration pathways. RSMS has the widest occupations list of any skilled migration visa type. Any occupation at ANZSCO skill level 1, 2 or 3 can be used to apply for an RSMS visa.
The RSMS Occupations List includes the following occupation categories:

  • Skill Level 1: Management and Professional occupations requiring a bachelor degree or 5 years of work experience
  • Skill Level 2: Associate Professional occupations requiring a diploma-level qualification or 3 years of work experience
  • Skill Level 3: Technician and Trade occupations requiring a Certificate III which includes 2 years of on-the-job training or a Certificate IV

The RSMSOL includes 224 occupations which are not on either the STSOL (used for 457 and ENS visa applications) or the MLTSSL (used for Skilled Independent Subclass 189 visas). These include occupations such as:

  • Various Specialist Managers such as PR managers, Policy and Planning Managers, Production Managers, Procurement Managers, Wholesalers and Importers or Exporters
  • Hospitality, Retail and Service Managers such as Retail Managers, Call or Contact Centre Managers and Financial Institution Branch Managers
  • Occupations in the Arts such as performers, authors, directors
  • Human Resources occupations
  • Sales Representatives in Industrial, Medical and Pharmaceutical Products
  • Air and Sea Transport Professionals such as pilots, ships engineers etc
  • Science occupations such as biochemists, metallurgists, research and development managers
  • Various engineering professional, technician and drafting specialisations
  • Office Managers and Practice Managers
  • Receptionists, secretaries and personal assistants
  • Child Care Group Leaders
  • Various trades

However, from March 2018, the selection of occupations for RSMS will be much more limited. Most applicants will need to have an occupation on the MLTSSL - at 183 occupations; this is much shorter than the RSMSOL which has 673 occupations. Additional occupations may be available for regional positions, but at this stage it is not clear how many extra occupations will be available.

Training Requirement

 

Unlike the 457 and ENS programs, the employer does not need to show that they have met the training benchmarks to be able to sponsor for RSMS. Establishing compliance with the training benchmarks is generally the most involved part of applying for 457 and ENS, so this is of great benefit.

From March 2018, a training levy will be payable when applying for an RSMS visa. For businesses with under AUD 10 million in turnover, the training levy will be $3,000. For larger businesses, the levy will be $5,000. It is not yet clear if this can be paid by the individual applying for the RSMS visa, or whether it must be paid by the employer.

Skill Level and English Requirement

Most applicants only need to meet the ANZSCO skill level for their occupation to meet the skill requirement for RSMS. Either a formal qualification or work experience is generally sufficient to meet the ANZSCO skill level, though registration is also necessary if this would be required for the position.

Unlike general skilled migration or the ENS Direct Entry Stream, a formal skills assessment is not in general required. This would normally only be necessary where nominating a trade occupation and where the applicant does not have an Australian trade certificate.

In terms of minimum work experience, this is currently not required if you hold a relevant qualification. This means that international students can potentially qualify for an RSMS visa without any work experience. 

From March 2018, a minimum of 3 years of work experience in the occupation will be required when applying for an RSMS visa.

For the Direct Entry RSMS pathway, Competent English is sufficient to qualify (6 in each band) - this is similar to what is required for the ENS visa, but significantly easier than the requirement for General Skilled Migration.

To meet the pass mark of 60 points for General Skilled Migration, many applicants will need Proficient English (7 in each band of IELTS or equivalent). Many applicants in pro rata occupations need 65 or 70 points to receive an invitation for a Skilled Independent Subclass 189 visa - these applicants may need to get full points for Superior English (8 in each band or equivalent).

The RSMS visa is a permanent visa which allows you to live in Australia indefinitely. This is more beneficial than the 457 visa, which for most occupations is now valid for only 2 years. It is also more beneficial than the Skilled Regional Provisional Subclass 489 visa, which is a 4-year visa which requires you to live and work in a regional area for 2 years before being eligible for permanent residence. However the RSMS visa can be cancelled if you do not commence work with your employer or if you do not stay with the employer for 2 years. However, if this is due to circumstances beyond your control (eg business went into liquidation, redundancy etc.), your visa is unlikely to be cancelled, particularly if you do continue to live in a regional area.

Lastly the RSMS is a highly beneficial visa which in many ways is easier to qualify for than the 457, ENS and General Skilled programs.

However, from March 2018, many applicants will no longer be eligible for the RSMS visa - particularly if your occupation is not on the MLTSSL or if you do not have 3 years of skilled work experience.

Contact Nevett Ford Lawyers if you require advice or assistance.

Employer Nomination Scheme S/C 186 Visa - Changes Commence

Further to the announcement earlier in the year by the Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP) the first wave of amendments to the Employer Nomination Scheme have been released, with most changes taking effect from 1 July 2017. 

The major talking points from these amendments include:

  • The reduction of the upper age limit from 49 to 44 years of age for an applicant (Direct Entry Stream);
  • The removal of the exemption from providing a skills assessment due to earnings being above the high income threshold (Direct Entry Stream);
  • The removal of the exemption from providing evidence of competent English due to earnings being above the high income threshold (Direct Entry Stream);
  • A change in the level of English Language Skill required by primary applicants (Temporary Residence Transition Stream).  This change has increased the requirements from vocational to competent which in practice this means an IELTS test score of at least 6 in all bands (or equivalent test); and
  • The introduction of specific requirements, for particular occupations (known as caveats) for applications made under the Direct Entry program.  This now mirrors that which applies under the Temporary Work 457 visa program which was originally introduced in April 2017. 

High Income Threshold Exemptions
While most of the above reforms apply on to applications lodged after 1st July 2017, both the English Language and Skills Assessment exemptions where the High Income Threshold was met were retrospectively applied to applications lodged but not finally determined by that date.  The subsequent media release made by the DIBP clarifying that these amendments would not be applied to applications lodged before 1 July 2017 has not yet been backed by formal legislative amendment supporting this statement.

Reforms Overall
In an earlier blog post we outlined the timetable of changes which is taking place.  The above represents step one of the broader reform agenda due to affect both the Temporary Work Visa program (Subclass 457) and the Employer Nomination Scheme (Subclass 186). This agenda will see changes rolled out on an on-going basis until March 2018, by which time all announced reforms will have been implemented. 

Whether you are an individual visa holder considering how these changes affect you personally or an employer wondering how these and the further proposed changes affect your ability to recruit globally please feel free to contact us at Nevett Ford to see how we are able to assist. 

 

Change to age limits for Working Holiday Maker Visas

The eligible age for Subclass 417 Working Holiday will be amended to be:

  • aged at least 18 and no more than 35 years old. If an age younger than 35 is specified in an instrument for a specified passport, that younger age limit will be applied

Subclass 462 Work and Holiday visas:

  • the increase to the age limit of 35 years is only available for those countries where Australia has negotiated a similar bilateral age increase.

These amendments apply to visa applications made on or after 1 July 2017.